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Sarah Stewart’s research group investigates the formation and evolution of planetary bodies. Our primary techniques are shock wave experiments to measure material properties and numerical simulations of planetary processes. We tackle a broad range of problems in planetary science by focusing on understanding the feedbacks between physical processes and changes in material properties.

CLEVER Planets

September 2018: We are pleased to announce the launch of CLEVER Planets (the Cycling of Life-Essential Volatile Elements on Rocky Planets), a NASA NExSS team investigating the necessary chemistry for a rocky planet to host life.

UC Davis announcement: How Do you Make an Earth-Like Planet?

Simons Collaboration on the Origin of Life

Image credit: NASA / Jenny Mottar

Sarah Stewart is a new Investigator in the Simons Collaboration on the Origins of Life. Her work will examine the effects of impact cratering on the environment of the early Earth.

Center for Matter at Extreme Conditions

Image credit: National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Sarah Stewart is a Co-PI on the new DOE-NNSA Center for Matter at Extreme Conditions. She will use shock physics experiments to study the physical properties and equations of state of planetary minerals and gases at extreme pressures and temperatures. These data will be used to understand the interior structures of planets and the outcomes of planetary collisions. The Center is led by Professor Farhat Beg at U. California San Diego.

Stewart Group Videos


Stewart Group News

The CLEVER Planets Team

September 19th, 2018|Comments Off on The CLEVER Planets Team

We are pleased to announce the launch of CLEVER Planets (the Cycling of Life-Essential Volatile Elements on Rocky Planets), a NASA NExSS team investigating the necessary chemistry for a rocky planet to host life. UC Davis [...]

New Model for Lunar Origin

February 28th, 2018|Comments Off on New Model for Lunar Origin

We present a new model for lunar accretion with a terrestrial synestia. The Moon is depleted in volatile elements compared to Earth. Our model explains the pattern and magnitude of depletion of these elements. The [...]

New postdocs!

February 8th, 2018|Comments Off on New postdocs!

Welcome to Bethany Chidester and Megan Duncan!

Planet Cakes!

May 22nd, 2017|Comments Off on Planet Cakes!

The Origins Group finds many reasons to throw a party. The latest reason was making planet cakes! We made Jupiter and Earth with Pangea. (Image gallery -- click on the cakes)

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