The CLEVER Planets Team

We are pleased to announce the launch of CLEVER Planets (the Cycling of Life-Essential Volatile Elements on Rocky Planets), a NASA NExSS team investigating the necessary chemistry for a rocky planet to host life. UC Davis announcement: How Do you Make an Earth-Like Planet?

By |2018-09-19T14:09:15+00:00September 19th, 2018|Uncategorized|Comments Off on The CLEVER Planets Team

New Model for Lunar Origin

We present a new model for lunar accretion with a terrestrial synestia. The Moon is depleted in volatile elements compared to Earth. Our model explains the pattern and magnitude of depletion of these elements. The key is understanding the pressures and temperatures of the rock vapor environment around the growing Moon. More information about our [...]

By |2018-02-28T09:32:53+00:00February 28th, 2018|Uncategorized|Comments Off on New Model for Lunar Origin

Synestia, a New Type of Planetary Object

Graduate student Simon Lock and Sarah Stewart define and explain a new type of planetary object. A synestia is formed by a giant impact. Synestias are an important stage of terrestrial planet formation, leading to mixing within the structure and the formation of moons. Our work is published today in the Journal of Geophysical Research Planets. [...]

By |2017-05-22T15:30:46+00:00May 22nd, 2017|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Synestia, a New Type of Planetary Object

New Center for Frontiers in High Energy Density Science

U. California has funded a new center in high energy density science. This center is a collaboration between 5 UC campuses, LLNL and LANL. One of the themes of our center is material properties under extreme conditions and applications to planetary science.

By |2016-11-16T09:03:03+00:00November 16th, 2016|Uncategorized|Comments Off on New Center for Frontiers in High Energy Density Science

Tidal Evolution of the Moon: Earth started tilted over

Our new model for the tidal evolution of the moon was published online today in Nature: Tidal Evolution of the Moon from a high-obliquity, high-angular-momentum Earth. The tidal evolution is a big piece of the puzzle of lunar origin. Read more about our work on making the Earth and Moon.

By |2016-10-31T15:12:01+00:00October 31st, 2016|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Tidal Evolution of the Moon: Earth started tilted over

K isotopes differ for Earth and Moon

Kun Wang and Stein Jacobsen's new paper "Potassium isotopic evidence for a high-energy giant impact origin of the Moon", published online in Nature, supports the idea that the Moon condensed from a highly vaporized Earth and disk.

By |2016-09-16T16:00:26+00:00September 16th, 2016|Uncategorized|Comments Off on K isotopes differ for Earth and Moon